The iPod’s Trademark Click Wheel

Technical infoUser user interface

The iPod’s trademark Click Wheel

iPods with color displays utilize anti-aliased graphics and text, with sliding animations. All iPods have five buttons and the later generations (Fourth and above) have the buttons incorporated into the click wheel a design which gives an uncluttered, minimalist interface. The buttons are:

Menu: to traverse in reverse through the menus, toggle the backlight on older iPods, and jump to the major menu on newer iPods

Center: to pick a menu item

Play / Time out: this functions as an off switch when held

Miss Forward / Quickly Forward

Avoid In reverse / Fast Reverse

Running system and firmware

The iPod’s os is kept on its devoted storage medium. An additional NOR flash ROM chip (either 1 MiB or 512 KiB) consists of a bootloader program that tells the device to pack its OS from the storage medium. Each iPod also has 32 MiB of RAM, although the 60 and 80 GB 5th generation, and the sixth generation designs have 64 MiB. A part of the RAM is used to hold the iPod OS filled from firmware, however most of it serves to cache tracks from the storage medium. For instance, an iPod could spin its hard drive up when and copy roughly 30 MB of upcoming tunes into RAM, thus conserving power by not requiring the drive to spin up for each tune. Rockbox and iPodLinux provide open-source options to the standard firmware and operating system, respectively. Nevertheless, at the present time these are both not available for use with the 6th generation iPod Classic due to encryption made use of on the official firmware.

Added functions

In March 2002, Apple included limited PDA-like functionality: text files can be shown, while contacts and schedules can be viewed and integrated with the host computer. Some built-in games are available, including Brick (a clone of Breakout), Parachute, Solitaire, and Music Quiz. A firmware upgrade released in September 2006 brought some extra features to 5th generation iPods including adjustable screen brightness, gapless playback, and downloadable games (readily available for buy from the iTunes Establishment).

Models

Generation

Image

Ability

Colours

Connection

Release date

Minimum OS to sync

Ranked battery life (hours)

initially

5 GIGABYTES

White

FireWire

October 23, 2001

Mac: 9.2.1, 10.1

audio: 10

10 GB

March 21, 2002

First design, with mechanical scroll wheel. 10 GIGABYTES design launched later. Not compatible with Windows.

initially

(1st modification)

5 GB

White

FireWire

July 17, 2002

Mac: 9.2.2, 10.1.4

Win: 2000

audio: 10

Mechanical scroll wheel. Windows-compatible model readily available. Windows compatibility through Musicmatch.

second

10 GIGABYTES

White

FireWire

July 17, 2002

Mac: 9.2.2, 10.1.4

Win: 2000

audio: 10

20 GB

Touch-sensitive wheel. FireWire port had a cover. Hold switch revised. Windows-compatible models offered. Windows compatibility through Musicmatch.

third

10 GB

White

FireWire (USB for data transfer just no charging)

April 28, 2003

Mac: 10.1.5

Win: 2000

audio: 8

15 GB

30 GB

First full redesign with all-touch interface, dock connector, and slimmer case. Musicmatch support dropped with later release of iTunes 4.1 for Windows.

third

(1st revision)

10 GIGABYTES

White

FireWire (USB for information transfer only no charging)

September 8, 2003

Mac: 10.1.5

Win: 2000

audio: 8

20 GB

40 GB

third

(2nd modification)

15 GIGABYTES

White

FireWire (USB for data transfer just no charging)

January 6, 2004

Mac: 10.1.5

Win: 2000

audio: 8

20 GIGABYTES

40 GIGABYTES

4th

20 GB

White

FireWire or USB

July 19, 2004

Mac: 10.1.5

Win: 2000

audio: 12

Black/Red (Scandal sheet U2)

October 26, 2004

40 GIGABYTES

White

July 19, 2004

Adopted Click Wheel from iPod Mini; pack-in devices reduced along with rate drop.

fourth

(picture)

40 GIGABYTES

White

FireWire or USB

October 26, 2004

Mac: 10.2.8

Win: 2000

audio: 15

slideshow: 5

60 GB

Premium spin-off of 4G iPod with color screen and photo viewing.

fourth

(image)

(1st modification)

30 GIGABYTES

White

FireWire or USB

February 23, 2005

Mac: 10.2.8

Win: 2000

audio: 15

slideshow: 5

60 GIGABYTES

Pack-ins and rate lowered. Images straight viewable by means of optional iPod Camera Connector.

4th

(with color screen)

20 GIGABYTES

White

Black/Red (Scandal sheet U2)

FireWire or USB

June 28, 2005

Mac: 10.2.8

Win: 2000

audio: 15

slideshow: 5

White (Scandal sheet Harry Potter)

September 7, 2005

60 GIGABYTES

White

June 28, 2005

“iPod with color screen”; basically, the iPod Picture design reintegrated with the main iPod Classic lineup.

fifth

30 GIGABYTES

White

Black

White (Unique Edition Harry Potter)

Black (Scandal sheet Harry Potter)

USB (FireWire for charging only)

October 12, 2005

Mac: 10.3.9

Win: 2000

audio: 14

slideshow: 3

video: 2

Black/Red

(Special Version U2)

June 6, 2006

60 GIGABYTES

White

Black

October 12, 2005

audio: 20

slideshow: 4

video: 3

Second full redesign with a slimmer case, a search function, and bigger display with video playback. Provided in black or white.

5th

(1st modification)

30 GB

White

Black

Black/Red (Scandal sheet U2)

USB (FireWire for charging just)

September 12, 2006

Mac: 10.3.9

Win: 2000

audio: 14

slideshow: 4

video: 3.5

80 GIGABYTES

White

Black

audio: 20

slideshow: 6

video: 6.5

Battery life improved for slideshow and video playbacks.

sixth

(traditional)

80 GB

Silver

Black

USB (FireWire for charging just)

September 5, 2007

Mac: 10.4.8

Win: XP SP2

audio: 30

video: 5

160 GIGABYTES

audio: 40

video: 7

Introduced the “Timeless” retronym. New interface and anodized aluminum front plate. Silver changes white.

sixth

(classic)

(1st modification)

120 GB

Silver

Black

USB (FireWire for charging just)

September 9, 2008

Mac: 10.4.11

Win: XP SP3

audio: 36

video: 6

Genius function included. 160 GB model dropped and 80 GB model upgraded to 120 GIGABYTES.

sixth

(classic)

(Second modification)

160 GB

Silver

Black

USB (FireWire for charging just)

September 9, 2009

Mac: 10.4.11

Win: XP SP3

audio: 36

video: 6

Capability increased to 160 GIGABYTES using single-platter drive.

First generation

A first generation iPod (2001)

Apple introduced the first-generation iPod on October 23, 2001, with the slogan “1,000 songs in your pocket”. The first iPod had a black and white LCD (liquid-crystal display) screen and showcased a 5 GB hard disk capable of storing 1,000 tracks encoded using MP3 and was priced at US$ 399. Amongst the iPod’s innovations were its little size, attained using a 1.8″ tough drive, whereas its competitors were utilizing 2.5″ hard disk drives at the time, and its easy-to-use navigation, which was regulated making use of a mechanical scroll wheel (unlike later iPods, which had touch-sensitive scroll wheels), a center select button, and 4 auxiliary buttons around the wheel. The iPod had actually a rated battery life of 10 hours.

On March 20, 2002, Apple presented a 10 GIGABYTES design of the first generation iPod for US$ 499. vCard compatibility was added, as well, permitting iPods to display company card details synced from a Mac.

Second generation

A second generation iPod (2002)

The 2nd generation iPod was presented on July 17, 2002. Using the same body style as the first generation, the hold switch was redesigned, a cover was included to the FireWire port, and the mechanical wheel was changed with a touch-sensitive wheel. The front plate also had rounded edges and edges. The second-generation course was readily available in 10 GIGABYTES for US$ 399 and 20 GB for US$ 499. The first-generation 5 GIGABYTES Classic was rollovered, but its cost was lowered to US$ 299.

Especially, Apple began offering Windows-compatible versions of the iPod beginning with the 2nd generation. These versions had a 4-pin to 6-pin FireWire adapter and were bundled with Musicmatch Jukebox rather of iTunes.

In December 2002, Apple unveiled its first restricted edition iPods, with either Madonna, Tony Hawk, or Beck signature or No Doubt’s band logo design engraved on the back for an additional US$ 50.

Third generation

A 3rd Generation iPod (2003)

On April 28, 2003, Apple revealed a completely revamped third-generation iPod. Thinner than the previous designs, the third generation models changed the FireWire port with a new Dock Connector (which is still used today) and introduced the Touch Wheel, a totally non-mechanical user interface with the four auxiliary buttons found in a row between the screen and the touch wheel. The front plate had rounded edges, and the rear case was a little rounded too. A brand-new wired remote port was presented. Whereas first and second generation Classics had an auxiliary ring around the headset port for the remote, the third generation Classic had a 4-pin jack adjacent to the headphone port. A 10 GB model was offered for US$ 299, a 15 GIGABYTES design for US$ 399, and a 30 GIGABYTES model for US$ 499. All iPods were now compatible with Mac and Windows from the box, just requiring Windows users to reformat the iPod prior to use on a COMPUTER and both iTunes and Musicmatch were bundled with all iPods. The battery life was minimized to 8 hours, partly due to using a lithium-ion battery rather than a lithium polymer battery.

The 15 GB design was replaced by a 20 GIGABYTES model and the 30 GB design was upgraded to 40 GIGABYTES on September 8, 2003. The Windows-based Musicmatch software application was made outdated by and replaced by iTunes 4.1, the first version readily available for Microsoft Windows.

Fourth generation

A 4th Generation iPod Picture (2004).

Declared on July 19, 2004, the fourth-generation iPod replaced the touch wheel from the 3rd generation iPod with the Click Wheel from the iPod Mini, putting the 4 auxiliary buttons below a touch-sensitive scroll wheel. The casing was also slightly slimmer. Rates was reduced and the lineup was streamlined, as the 20 GIGABYTES model was cost US$ 299 and the 40 GIGABYTES design for US$ 399. Especially, Apple started lowering pack-in accessories starting with the 4th generation. While a dock, carrying case, and wired remote were formerly consisted of with higher-end iPods, the higher-level 40GB iPod only included a dock, Sennheiser-iPod earphones and an interchangeable exclusive cable television efficient in USB and FireWire user interface. In addition to making use of the iPod Mini’s Click Wheel, the fourth generation Classic utilized the more energy-efficient parts of the Mini, enabling the 4th generation iPod to over 12 hours of battery life while using the same battery as its predecessor.

A special U2 version was revealed on October 26, 2004, to cross-market U2′s How to Take apart an Atomic Bomb cd. The plastic front piece of the U2 version iPod was black and the scroll wheel was red, to accompany the color plan of the U2 cd. With 30 GIGABYTES and the signatures of all four members of U2, the scandal sheet iPod was priced at US$ 349 as well as included a US$ 50 coupon for a US$ 149 collection of U2′s entire back magazine. U2 iPods had unique privileges, such as downloading tunes for complimentary.

An Unique Harry Potter Edition was revealed on September 7, 2005. It was launched in combination with the Harry Potter Audiobooks in iTunes. It had a Hogwarts logo design engraved on the back, and all 6 Harry Potter Audiobooks which were readily available at the time preloaded.

iPod Image

Main article: iPod Picture

At the exact same time that the U2 iPod was announced, Apple also unveiled the iPod Image.

Placed as a premium variation of the basic fourth-generation iPod, the iPod Photo featured a 220×176 pixel LCD capable of showing up to 65,536 colors. The picture supported JPEG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, and PNG graphic file formats, and might be connected to a tv or other external screen for slideshows. The battery was rated for 15 hours for music playback and 5 hours for slideshows with music. The picture was offered in a 40 GB version for US$ 499 and a 60 GB version for US$ 599.

On February 23, 2005, both40 GB models (picture and routine) were replaced with a slimmer and lower-priced (US$ 349) 30 GIGABYTES image model leaving just a 20GB iPod regular left. The price for the 60 GB design was dropped to US$ 449, and accessory pack-ins were minimized, making the dock, FireWire cable television, and television cable television extra-cost options.

iPod With Color Screen

Main short articles: iPod With Color Screen and iPod (With Color Screen)

On June 28, 2005, the iPod Image was merged into the monochrome iPod line. The 30 GB model was dropped, and the 20 GIGABYTES monochrome iPod received a color display. The price for the 60 GB design was likewise dropped to US$ 399.

Fifth generation

5th Generation iPod in white (2005).

The 5th generation iPod was introduced on October 12, 2005, quickly after the intro of the iPod Nano. The fifth generation iPod featured a 2.5″ 320×240 QVGA screen and a smaller sized Click Wheel. It is also referred to as the iPod Video.

The iPod Video is the first iPod to be readily available in an alternative color design in a non-special version kind, as a black choice was added alongside “Signature iPod White”, and marked the second complete redesign of the iPod’s aesthetic with its re-arranged percentages, its go back to a fully flat front plate, and its more rounded back case. The 4-pin remote port was eliminated also, causing in reverse compatibility issues with particular accessories. A 30 GB model was offered for US$ 299 and a 60 GIGABYTES design was provided for US$ 399. The iPod Video was likewise provided in the U2 special version for US$ 349 with 30 GIGABYTES. The iPod Video was the last model to have a plastic face.

6G (left) & & 5G (right) iPod Classic revealing the upgraded view feature.

The iPod Video plays video in MP4 (approximately 2.5 Mbit/s) and H. 264 (up to 1.5 Mbit/s, baseline profile just) formats. Video such as TV shows, podcasts, music videos, and motion pictures could be acquired from online establishments such as the iTunes Shop, or downloaded from Google Video and various other sources, then imported to the iPod through iTunes software application.

Videos or image slideshows could be played from the 5th generation iPod on a television, projector or screen with using the Apple iPod AV cable or by means of a dock utilizing an S-Video cable. It is likewise possible to do this utilizing some camcorder cable televisions with an RCA connectivity at one end and a three-banded eighth-inch (3.5 mm) A/V plug at the various other, nevertheless the red and yellow plugs (usually the audio right and video signals respectively) need to be exchanged around in order to attain the appropriate signal.

The iPod Video was upgraded on September 12, 2006. This upgrade consisted of a more vibrant screen, a search function, gapless playback, support for iPod games, and newly designed earphones. The rejuvenated iPod likewise had a longer video playback time.

Support for iPod games for the Video and gapless playback for all iPods were enabled through a firmware upgrade. An iTunes installment CD was likewise no more bundled, requiring users to download iTunes from Apple’s website. Throughout this upgrade, the 60 GB model was replaced with an 80 GIGABYTES model, and rates were cut by US$ 50 for both the 30 GB (US$ 249) and the 80 GIGABYTES (US$ 349) designs.

In this iPod a search function was likewise included, enabling the individual to look for content on the device.

Sixth generation

Sixth Generation (2007).

During a special iPod-centric occasion on September 5, 2007, Steve Jobs presented the sixth generation iPod and the retronym suffix “Timeless”. Including somewhat thinner bodies, the sixth generation Classic likewise sported considerably improved battery life, asserting approximately 40 hours of music playback and 7 hours of video playback. The iPod Classic has a 2.5″ backlit screen at a resolution of 320×240. The front plate of the iPod is now made of anodized aluminum rather of polycarbonate plastic, and “Signature iPod White” has been changed by silver. This means that it is the first time that white is not a color choice for an iPod in the iPod household. The sixth generation Classic likewise introduced a totally upgraded interface, incorporating more graphics and Cover Flow. The sixth generation Classic was provided in an 80 GB (20,000 tunes) design for MSRP US$ 249/GBP159 and a 160 GB (40,000 tunes) model for MSRP US$ 349/GBP229. The U2 scandal sheet has actually been dropped.

During the ‘Let’s Rock’ Apple Event on September 9, 2008, the 80 GIGABYTES and the thicker 160 GB model were stopped in favor of a thin 120 GB variation retailing for US$ 249/GBP179. It presented Brilliant and audio recording abilities which are also available in other iPod models launched at similar times; however, no firmware upgrade offers either showcases to the first generation iPod classics

Prior to the ‘It’s Only Rock and Roll’ event on September 9, 2009, the rate of the 120 GIGABYTES variation was dropped to US$ 229. Throughout the occasion Apple re-introduced the 160 GIGABYTES version with the exact same slim profile as the 120 GIGABYTES version, retailing at US$ 249/GBP185. The 120 GB design has actually now been dropped and the only option readily available is the 160 GB design.

Timeline of full-size iPod designs

See likewise: Timeline of compact iPod designs and Timeline of iPod models

Sources: Apple news release collection, Mactracker Apple Inc. design data source

References

Wikimedia Commons has actually media associated with: iPod timeless

^ Apple – QuickTime – September 2007 Keynote Address

^ Apple Introduces 10 GB iPod2,000 Tunes in Your Pocket, Apple, 2002-03-20. Recovered on 2007-02-18.

^ Dalrymple, Jim. Restricted Edition Madonna, Tony Hawk, Beck iPods. Macworld, 2002-09-10. Recovered on 2007-01-07.

^ http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2005/sep/07potter.html

^ http://reviews.cnet.com/mp3-players/apple-ipod-classic

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